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Fukushima

Fukushima
A region which has bounced back from calamity in style — come discover the richness of samurai culture in one of Honshu’s most historic prefectures.
Fukushima Tourist Attractions

The name of Fukushima Prefecture has some unfortunate associations given recent history, but the area is so much more than its past trauma. Against the odds, this part of Japan has made a stunning recovery, and is restored to its former glory as a hub of history, nature, and agriculture.

The prefecture is dominated by mountains, with its cities and towns — including the capital, Fukushima City — resting in the basins and valleys between. These places were once hubs of samurai culture, and they’re still dedicated to preserving the horse-riding traditions of their ancestors even now. You’ll find plenty of charming castle towns just packed with history dotted around the region, one of the best being Tsurugajo Castle.

In the middle of Fukushima, you’ll find the formidable Inawashiro Lake, which stretches across a full 100 square kilometers. Here and throughout its many mountains are some excellent spots for natural beauty and adventure, such as the Tadami Bridge Viewpoint, dozens of fantastic parks, and the picturesque Higashiyama Onsen town. Winter sports are also very much on the cards too, with a generous amount of snowfall blanketing the mountains each year.

The remarkable speed with which Fukushima has bounced back from disaster, and begun to truly flourish, is testament to the spirit and fortitude of its people — these are samurai folk, after all!

Local Weather
DEC-FEB
-2
°
 8
°
MAR-MAY
0
°
 23
°
JUN-AUG
16
°
 30
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SEP-NOW
10
°
 23
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Frequently Asked Questions
What to eat in Fukushima?
Japanese ramen is perhaps the most important dish here, so you have to sample some Kitakata ramen and Shirakawa ramen: two varieties of soy sauce-based noodle soup with unique, thick noodles. Sake is another top Fukushima culinary export, as the huge amount of high-grade rice makes for excellent, clean flavors.
What are the best things to do in Fukushima?
Get back to nature at Lake Inawashiro, Goshikinuma, or Oze National Park. Alternatively, transport yourself to the past by visiting Oichi-juku historic village, or watch a bona-fide samurai horse race in Minamisoma during the Soma Nomaoi festival.
Is Fukushima safe to visit?
Absolutely! The quick action taken to limit the damage caused by the disaster in 2011, and the admirable clean-up efforts undertaken since, mean that there’s absolutely nothing to worry about when visiting Fukushima Prefecture. In fact, it's quite amazing how fast the region has bounced back over the past decade.
What is Fukushima famous for?
Well, internationally, it’s associated only with the earthquake of 2011, but in Japan it’s synonymous with agriculture — rice, peaches, and cherries — and celebrated as a time capsule for Japanese samurai culture. The annual samurai events in this region are totally unique, and really worth seeing.Well, internationally, it’s associated only with the earthquake of 2011, but in Japan it’s synonymous with agriculture — rice, peaches, and cherries — and celebrated as a time capsule for Japanese samurai culture. The annual samurai events in this region are totally unique, and really worth seeing.
What to buy in Fukushima?
Aizu lacquerware is prized across Japan for its craftsmanship and beauty. The style dates back over 400 years, and the techniques used have remained much the same since those days.
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