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47 Prefectures, 47 Japanese Food Souvenirs: Japan's Regional Omiyage

By Lucy Baker
June 9, 2021
Updated: November 4, 2021

Featuring beautiful packaging and regional flavors, Japanese food souvenirs are known as omiyage in Japanese. Even for local Japanese residents, it’s customary to bring back Japanese omiyage for your family, friends, or co-workers whenever you visit other prefectures in Japan. These edible Japanese omiyage are inspired by local delicacies and ingredients, making them delicious and unique souvenirs from Japan (both for your tastebuds and your friends’ tummies), and are sold everywhere! From local sweets to savory snacks, these Japanese food souvenirs are diverse as each prefecture in Japan.

If you are looking for the best souvenirs from Japan to give to all your family and friends, these specialty food omiyage make the perfect gifts as a little taste of your Japan experience. From Hokkaido to Tokyo to Okinawa, check out our list of Japanese prefectures and their regional food souvenirs below!

Japanese Food Souvenirs: Omiyage From Each of the 47 Prefectures

  1. Hokkaido - Shiori Koibito 
  2. Aomori - Kininaru Ringo
  3. Iwate - Nanbu Senbei
  4. Miyagi - Hagi no Tsuki
  5. Akita - Ichigo Miruku
  6. Yamagata - Cherries
  7. Fukushima - Mamador
  8. Ibaraki - Mito Natto
  9. Tochigi - Utsunomiya Gyoza Senbei
  10. Gunma - Onsen Manju
  11. Saitama - Gokabou
  12. Chiba - Peanut Monaka
  13. Tokyo - Tokyo Banana
  14. Kanagawa - Strawberry Cheesecake Kit Kat
  15. Niigata - Kaki no Tane
  16. Toyama - Hotaru Ika Senbei
  17. Ishikawa. - Gold Leaf Castella Cake
  18. Fukui - Habutae Mochi
  19. Yamanashi - Fujisan Yokan
  20. Nagano - Kuri Daifuku
  21. Gifu - Ayugashi
  22. Shizuoka - Wasabi Kit Kat
  23. Aichi - Akafuku Mochi
  24. Mie - Ise Cha
  25. Shiga - Baumkuchen
  26. Kyoto - Yatsuhashi
  27. Osaka - Takoyaki Pringles
  28. Hyogo - Kobe Purin
  29. Nara - Nata Uta Senbei
  30. Wakayama - Umeboshi
  31. Tottori - Suna no Oka
  32. Shimane - Shimanekko Cookies
  33. Okayama - Kibidango
  34. Hiroshima - Momiji Manju
  35. Yamaguchi - Tsuki de Hirotta Tamago
  36. Tokushima - Take Chikuwa
  37. Kagawa - Wasanbon
  38. Ehime - Tanuki Monaka
  39. Kochi - Imo Kenpi
  40. Fukuoka - Menbei
  41. Saga - Ogi Yokan
  42. Nagasaki - Castella Cake
  43. Kumamoto - Kumamon Imagawayaki
  44. Oita - Ichiman-en no Sato Senbei
  45. Miyazaki - Cheese Manju
  46. Kagoshima - Beni Imo Kit Kat
  47. Okinawa - Chinsuko

1. Hokkaido - Shiroi Koibito 

Shiroi Koibito Cookies in a box with one cookie at the front

Hokkaido is famous for its high-quality dairy products and juicy Yubari King melons, but one of the best Japanese omiyage from Japan’s northernmost island is Shiroi Koibito cookies! These famous “white lover” biscuits are a homage to winter in Hokkaido with white chocolate sandwiched between two light slices of their signature biscuits. They are made by the luxurious local sweets company Ishiya and are some of the most iconic Japanese food souvenirs in the country.

2. Aomori - Kininaru Ringo

Kininaru Ringo Omiyage from Aomori on display at a shop in tall piles of boxes

A prefecture located in northern Japan, Aomori is famous for its juicy apples. One of the most popular omiyage from Aomori is the Kininaru Ringo, which are apple pies made from locally grown fuji apples. These delicious omiyage have a whole apple inside each pastry!

3. Iwate - Nambu Senbei

Nambu Senbei from Iwate on a wooden plate on a wooden table

A famous snack from the town of Hachinohe in Iwate Prefecture, Nambu Senbei is one of the most iconic omiyage available in Iwate. These thin, traditional crackers often have speckles of sesame or peanuts throughout them, with a salty kick. They are known for being the final garnish in Hachinohe Senbei Soup, crumbled up over a local soup recipe made of meat and vegetables.

4. Miyagi - Hagi no Tsuki

Hagi No Tsuki - Sweet from Miyagi with an image of a Japanese geisha on the front

Hagi No Tsuki is a famous Japanese food souvenir from the capital of Miyagi Prefecture, Sendai. Inside this beautifully packaged omiyage, you will find a soft, plump sponge cake filled with decadent custard. The name of this iconic sweet references the hagi (meaning "bush clovers") and the tsuki (moon) and its shape.

5. Akita - Ichigo Miruku

Shelf of Ichigo Miruku (Strawberry Milk) Candies in Akita

Ichigo Miruku (meaning "strawberry milk") is the ultra-cute collab that brings together the iconic Hello Kitty with Akita’s folklore demons, locally known as namahage. You can grab a lot of namahage-themed souvenirs from Akita, as well as sweets and snacks that pay homage to the Akita inu (dog).

6. Yamagata - Cherries

Cherries from Yamagata in a bowl

Yamagata Prefecture is famous for its sumptuous cherries, meaning that one of their most famous omiyage is a jelly with a whole cherry inside! Other than cherry-flavored souvenirs, their locally famous omiyage are known as karakara senbei. These sweetened rice crackers are folded into a signature triangle shape, each with a small toy inside!

7. Fukushima - Mamador

Mamador from Fukushima on a display at a store

Mamador or Mamadoru in Japanese is a famous cookie from Fukushima Prefecture. It is a cake-like sweet souvenir whose name comes from the Spanish word for "sucker."

8. Ibaraki - Mito Natto

Mito Natto or Wara Natto in Ibaraki, Japanese fermented soy beans wrapped in straw

Also known as tengu natto or wara natto (for "long" or "straw" natto respectively), Mito Natto comes from the Mito area of Ibaraki and is a local specialty. This prefecture is well known for its natto products, and this omiyage has natto (fermented soybeans) inside the straw casings! You can purchase Mito Natto to take away with you as a savory Japanese food souvenir from the local area.

9. Tochigi - Utsunomiya Gyoza Senbei

Gyoza Senbei Crackers in a Box from Tochigi Prefecture

The Utsunomiya region of Tochigi Prefecture astonishingly consumes the most amount of gyoza dumplings annually in the whole of Japan! So among other gyoza-themed omiyage, these locally-made senbei crackers are a great Japanese food souvenir from Tochigi.

10. Gunma - Onsen Manju

Onsen Manju Kit Kats from Hot Spring Town Gunma

Gunma is known as a famous region for hot springs in Japan (onsen). Onsen manju or hot spring steamed buns (usually filled with red bean paste) are said to have originated in Gunma. These soft and spongy sweets make for a great omiyage, and better still, you can take home onsen manju flavored Kit Kats!

11. Saitama - Gokabou

Tray of Gokabou from Saitama Prefecture

Gokabou is a long, cylindrical Japanese sweet cake from Saitama Prefecture that is covered in delicate soybean powder. The name loosely translates to mean “5 grains are a family’s treasure.”

12. Chiba - Peanut Monaka

Peanut Monaka from Chiba on a plate

Chiba Prefecture is famous for its production of peanuts! This Peanut Monaka has a cracker that looks like a peanut with sweet azuki red bean paste inside it.

13. Tokyo - Tokyo Banana

Tokyo Banana - Most Famous Omiyage Souvenir in Tokyo on display at a department store in Tokyo

Known as the official omiyage and best souvenir from Tokyo, Tokyo Banana is a bite-sized, sweet banana-shaped sponge cake. This spongy and iconic souvenir is filled with cream and uses real bananas in its recipe.

14. Kanagawa - Strawberry Cheesecake Kit Kat

Strawberry Cheese Cake Flavored Kit Kats from Yokohama in Kanagawa Prefecture

This special Strawberry Cheesecake Kit Kat is the perfect Japanese food souvenir from Yokohama, the capital of Kanagawa Prefecture. Made with natural cheese and cream, these white chocolate-based Yokohama Kit Kats are delicious!

15. Niigata - Kaki No Tane

Kaki no Tane from Niigata, beer snack from Japan, the pack is open on a table with the main packet behind it

Also known as Kaki-pi, Kaki No Tane is a popular drinking snack that was initially born in Niigata Prefecture. Salty peanuts are mixed together with small crunchy senbei pieces which loosely resemble persimmon seeds.

16. Toyama - Hotaru Ika Senbei

Horaku Ika Senbei Cracker from Toyama, Squid Cracker

Toyama is home to the local squid, hotaru ika. These savory senbei have squid inside the crackers!

17. Ishikawa - Gold Leaf Castella Cake

Castella Cake with Gold Leaf from Kanazawa in Ishikawa Prefecture on a plate with a dark background

Kanazawa, the capital of Ishikawa Prefecture, is famous for its gold leaf crafts. For a fancy souvenir, you can buy Gold Leaf Castella Cakes that are topped with edible gold!

18. Fukui - Habutae Mochi

Habutaemochi from Fukui Prefecture one stacked upon 2 of them surrounded by cherry blossoms

Silky in texture and a reference to the region’s silk production history, Habutae Mochi is a special type of mochi from Fukui Prefecture. Typically in thin strips, these are made from rice flour and sugar (sometimes wrapped around soybean pastes).

19. Yamanashi - Fujisan Yokan

Mount Fuji shaped sweets from Yamanashi in a box

Fujisan Yokan is the perfect souvenir from Yamanashi Prefecture, with different jelly sweets in the shape of Mount Fuji inside! This region shares the majestic Mount Fuji with Shizuoka Prefecture.

20. Nagano - Kuri Daifuku

Kuri Daifuku Mochi on a plate from Nagano

Daifuku mochi is a pounded rice cake with a filling inside it, traditionally red bean paste. However, kuri or chestnuts are grown in the Nagano area, so these Kuri Daifuku are the best souvenirs from Nagano Prefecture.

21. Gifu - Ayugashi

Ayugashi from Gifu, two small cakes on a plate in the shape of local fish

A traditional omiyage, Ayugashi represent the elongated shape of the local sweetfish that live in Gifu Prefecture’s Nagaragawa River. These Japanese food souvenirs are made from castella cake wrapped around a soft paste called gyuhi, which is made from sticky rice.

22. Shizuoka - Wasabi Kit Kat

Hand holding a wasabi Kit Kat from Shizuoka Prefecture in Japan

Other than being well known for its tea production, Shizuoka Prefecture in Japan is also very famous for its locally grown wasabi. This zingy horseradish flavor can be found in specialty Wasabi Kit Kats! Take these souvenirs home to your family and friends as one of the weirdest Kit Kat flavors out there.

23. Aichi - Akafuku Mochi

Akafuku Mochi from Aichi

Akafuku Mochi is a special type of mochi from the Ise region of Aichi Prefecture in Tohoku. The difference between these is that red bean paste is on the outside of these sweet pounded rice balls.

24. Mie - Ise Cha

Two cups of Japanese tea from Ise in Mie Prefecture of Japan

Ise in Mie Prefecture is one of Japan’s holiest sites, and the area is one of the country’s lesser-known (yet still extremely high quality) tea producers. Some Ise cha or “Ise tea” makes for a great souvenir to bring home along with some locally famous nagamochi (long, thin mochi cakes that are grilled and filled with red bean paste.)

25. Shiga - Baumkuchen

Baumkuchen from Shiga Prefecture on a plate, layer cake with a hole in the center

Shiga Prefecture is home to Japan’s largest lake, Lake Biwa or Biwako, and is also known for its high quality Baumkuchen layer cakes. Originally introduced from Europe, you can buy these throughout Japan, but Shiga offers some of the best in the country!

26. Kyoto - Yatsuhashi

Yatsuhashi - mochi in triangle shape from Kyoto, two packets

Yatsuhashi is the most popular Japanese food souvenir from Kyoto. Filled with different flavors of bean paste, these triangular-shaped sweets are made from rice flour, sugar, and the secret ingredient: cinnamon.

27. Osaka - Takoyaki Pringles

Takoyaki Octopus Ball flavored Pringles from Osaka in Donki Hote Department Store, Kansai Omiyage

Osaka is famous for being Japan’s foodie capital and home of signature dishes takoyaki (octopus balls) and okonomiyaki (savory pancakes). So, it’s no surprise you can grab these takoyaki flavored Pringles on your next visit to the Kansai region.

28. Hyogo - Kobe Purin

Kobe Pudding from Hyogo Prefecture in a box

A famous dessert from the Hyogo Prefecture’s capital of Kobe, Kobe Purin or “Kobe Pudding” is an iconic local omiyage. Made from eggs and heavy cream, it is soft and delicious (and ideal when you can’t give your friends Kobe beef)!

29. Nara - Nara Uta Senbei

Deer themed omiyage from Nara Prefecture on a shelf in a shop including Nara Uta Senbei crackers

Nara is known for its population of deer, who you can even buy shika senbei (deer crackers) for if you want to feed them. However, as the region’s mascot, this deer character represents the locally famous Todaiji Temple as well as the on-site deer, so you can get Nara Uta Senbei and other themed omiyage from Nara.

30. Wakayama - Umeboshi

Umeboshi Picked Plums from Wakayama in a bowl

Wakayama Prefecture is famous for its plums, and subsequently the zingy umeboshi it produces. These pickled plums are not to everyone's taste, but they are a fun souvenir to try with your friends at home if you can’t get your hands on some classic Kagerou sweets from Wakayama.

31. Tottori - Suna no Oka

Tottori Suna no Oka are Omiyage Souvenirs from Tottori -

Laying to the west of Kyoto Prefecture, Tottori’s claim to fame is its massive sand dunes, a prominent local attraction. Its best known omiyage is called Suna no Oka, which are rounded cookies lightly dusted with a sweet powder that resemble the sand of the dunes.

32. Shimane - Shimanekko Cookies

Shimanekko Senbei - crackers printed with Shimane Prefecture's mascot, Shimanekko

Shimanekko is the local mascot for Shimane Prefecture, so its face on a crunchy cookie makes for a perfect omiyage. You can find the cute-looking Shimanekko on many different souvenirs throughout the Shimane region.

33. Okayama - Kibidango

Two packets of Kibidango from Okayama

Brightly packaged and with great appeal for kids, kibidango is a sweet dumpling from Okayama Prefecture in the Shikoku region. Usually made with a mix of mochi flour and millet flour, you can get them in plain flavor, kinako (soybean powder), and more.

34. Hiroshima - Momiji Manju

Momiji Manju - Japanese waffles in the shape of maple leaves in Hiroshima on display in a box

Momiji manju are sweet bean cakes in the shape of maple leaves made with a cast iron grill. These are best known in Hiroshima as a popular Japanese food souvenir from Miyajima Island, just off of Hiroshima’s shores.

35. Yamaguchi - Tsuki de Hirotta Tamago

Yamaguchi - Tsuki de Hirotta Tamago

Tsuki de Hirotta Tamago is one of the most famous omiyage in Yamaguchi, with the name translating to “Eggs Found on the Moon.” Round and cute, it is a soft cake with a creamy filling that is flecked with chestnuts.

36. Tokushima - Take Chikuwa

Take Chikuwa from Tokushima Prefecture, a row of cylinder fish cakes on bamboo rods

A Take Chikuwa is a cylindrical fish cake that is cooked with a bamboo rod running through it. This is a famous food from Tokushima Prefecture, and can be taken home as a souvenir with many shops selling them packaged up!

37. Kagawa - Wasanbon

Wasanbon traditional Japanese dry wagashi sweets in a box with different biscuits from Kagawa

Named after the fine-grained sugar they are made from, wasanbon are dry and crumbly wagashi sweets that are traditionally made in the Shikoku region. Brightly-colored packs of multicolored wasanbon make a great souvenir from Kagawa or Tokushima.

38. Ehime - Tanuki Monaka

Tanuki Monaka in the shape of a racoon from Ehime Prefecture

This cute raccoon shaped wafer cracker is a signature omiyage of Ehime Prefecture! A Tanuki Monaka filling usually consists of a mixture of chestnuts with bean paste inside.

39. Kochi - Imo Kenpi

Imo Kenpi sweet potato chips from Kochi in a a bag

Imo Kenpi is amongst the most popular Japanese food souvenirs of Kochi. Made from local sweet potatoes (which are famously extra sweet) they are cut into fine strips and are fried to become delicious and crunchy chips!

40. Fukuoka - Menbei

Menbei Crackers from Fukuoka in a box

A menbei is the combination of “men” from mentaiko (pickled cod roe) with “bei” from senbei (“cracker”). Pickled cod roe is a famous product in Fukuoka, so these thin crackers with a zingy mentaiko bite are a popular Fukuoka omiyage.

41. Saga - Ogi Yokan

Yokan from Saga Prefecture on a plate

Yokan is a typical Japanese wagashi sweet that is made from bean paste, agar, and sugar. These Ogi Yokan are a specialty from Saga, and are an ideal souvenir from this prefecture.

42. Nagasaki - Castella Cake

Two slices of Castella Cake from Nagasaki

Castella cake was introduced to the port town of Nagasaki, by the Portuguese in the 16th century. Castella has since become an iconic Japanese food souvenir of Nagasaki Prefecture. With a light vanilla flavor, this fluffy sponge cake comes in soft rectangular slices.

43. Kumamoto - Kumamon Imagawayaki

Kumamon Imagawayaki Cake from Kumamoto next to some fake grass

The ultra kawaii and iconic black bear with red cheeks is Kumamoto’s mascot. Better known as Kumamon, you can find this character everywhere in Kumamoto like on these Kumamon Imagawayaki, a sweet filling-stuffed pancake made in a cast iron grill; a typical snack at festivals.

44. Oita - Ichiman-en no Sato Senbei

Ichiman-en no Sato Senbei from Oita Prefecture, cracker that looks like Japanese 10000 yen note

The 10,000 yen note features the face of the famous academic, Yukichi Fukuzawa, who was born in Oita Prefecture. This senbei cracker has since been made in his honor as a souvenir in the shape of the note.

45. Miyazaki - Cheese Manju

Miyazaki Cheese Manju

Cheese Manju is a small confection made of cream cheese encased in cookie dough. More than 200 stores in the Miyazaki area sell this famous omiyage.

46. Kagoshima - Beni Imo Kit Kat

Beni Imo Kit Kat from Kyushu, Kagoshima, purple sweet potato Kit Kat

Beni imo or purple sweet potato is locally famous in Kagoshima, the country’s largest producer of this vibrant vegetable. Proudly used as a local flavor, this Beni Imo Kit Kat from Kagoshima and Okinawa in Kyushu makes a great omiyage, mimicking the flavor of other purple sweet potato-flavored sweets you can buy from this tropical southern paradise!

47. Okinawa - Chinsuko

Chinsuko Cookies from Okinawa made from local salt

Made with local salt, Chinsuko is Okinawa’s specialty shortbread cookie. These long-shaped, salty, sweet snacks often come in other colorful flavors like Okinawan sweet potato. Other popular types of Okinawa souvenirs include shikuwasa (a local tropical citrus fruit) flavored drinks and sweets.

In summary, using regional flavors and ingredients, each of the 47 prefectures of Japan have their own delicious specialty snacks that are perfect to give to family and friends. If you are looking for beautifully packaged Japanese food souvenirs, you can pick up some omiyage from whichever prefecture you are traveling through on your next trip to Japan!

Browse food experiences in Japan or check out Japan by Food on YouTube for more travel inspiration!

We strive to be as accurate as possible and keep up with the changing landscape of Japan’s food and travel industries. If you spot any inaccuracies, please send a report.
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Lucy Baker
Never not hungry, Lucy is an artist and foodie from Australia. You can find her hunting for the next delicious deal, documenting her food, or brunching. She lives firmly by the philosophy that food friends are the best of friends.
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