Restaurants in Japan(2285)

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COURSE MENU
TOKYO

HOMMAGE

Chef Arai Noboru brings unpretentious French cuisine — and two Michelin Stars — back to his hometown of Asakusa, where he pays homage to his teachers and his suppliers by delighting guests with a no-frills approach.
Lunch: ¥18,000-40,000
Dinner: ¥35,000-60,000
(2)
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Sushi Tenkawa

Sushi Tenkawa invites guests to savor meticulously curated sushi courses in Ebisu. Take time to relax away from the busy city and indulge in Edomae sushi and seasonal vegetables for a colorful and delicious sushi experience.
Lunch: ¥10,000-40,000
Dinner: ¥20,000-40,000
(2)
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Udatsu Sushi

Chef Udatsu Hisashi makes an unorthodox combination of herbs and sushi at his Michelin-starred Nakameguro restaurant. Designed around the theme of “art x sushi”, every piece of nigiri and maki look just as good as they taste.
Lunch: ¥12,000-18,000
Dinner: ¥23,000-43,000
(1)
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Imayoshi Otemachi Sushi

The oldest sushi restaurant in Otemachi, Tokyo — get a taste of true sushi tradition.
Lunch: ¥25,000-30,000
Dinner: ¥25,000-30,000
(11)
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Shojin Ryori Daigo

Sample the all-natural, meat-free cuisine of historic Japanese Buddhism at this Michelin-starred restaurant in Tokyo.
Lunch: ¥15,000-20,000
Dinner: ¥25,000-40,000
(2)
COURSE MENU
KYOTO

Seiwasou

The beautiful Edo period architecture of Seiwasou draws many guests to its gardens, and the traditional Kyoto-style kaiseki cuisine keeps them at the table.
Lunch: ¥7,000-45,000
Dinner: ¥15,000-45,000
(1)
COURSE MENU
FUKUOKA

Sushi Tomo

Enjoy Chef Tomonaga Toshiharu’s signature sushi with natural salt from Nagasaki’s Goto Islands and a generous squeeze of citrus juice, made with the finest Fukuoka seafood purchased fresh every morning.
Lunch: ¥10,000-20,000
Dinner: ¥10,000-20,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Azabu Asai

Located in one of Tokyo’s most glamorous districts, this 21-seater Nishi-Azabu establishment transforms ingredients sourced directly from head chef Taichi Asai’s hometown into a masterful mixture of French-tinged Kyoto culinary tradition.
Lunch: ¥10,000-20,000
Dinner: ¥20,000-40,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Kani Kato Asakusa

A veteran kappo chef whips the freshest crabs from Hokkaido, Fukui and Ishikawa Prefectures into stunning course menu spreads that let diners relish the textures, flavors and colors of the season through the avenue of fresh-caught seafood.
Dinner: ¥38,000-65,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Tsunokamizaka Koshiba

Savor hassun, a dish expressing Japan’s ancient way of life and the essence of kappo cuisine, served on antique dishes that evoke the tastes and aromas of Yayoi kitchens long forgotten.
Dinner: ¥25,000-30,000
COURSE MENU
NARA

Sukiyaki Kappo Kitsune

Just a short walk from Kintetsu-Nara Station, this back-alley sukiyaki restaurant is reinventing Meiji-era cuisine with French-influenced starters and Nara-grown local ingredients.
Lunch: ¥7,000-18,000
Dinner: ¥18,000-18,000
(2)
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

NOURA

Asakusa visitors will find that they won’t have to break the bank for Michelin-standard French food at this bistro. Served up by two France-trained chefs, NOURA’s cuisine is unpretentious, relaxed, and most importantly, absolutely delicious.
Lunch: ¥5,000-10,000
Dinner: ¥10,000-15,000
(1)
COURSE MENU
ISHIKAWA

La Luce (Kanazawa)

At this restaurant near the Kenrokuen Gardens, top-quality ingredients from France, Italy and the Kanazawa locality are expertly made into French-inspired Italian cuisine, served atop gorgeous artisanal Imari porcelain.
Lunch: ¥15,000-25,000
Dinner: ¥15,000-25,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Yakitori Ginza I

Generous use of seasonal vegetables and inventive twists like foie gras in chicken tsukune set Chef Koichi Inoue’s yakitori restaurant apart. When dining at Yakitori Ginza I, wine pairings from the in-house sommelier are a must.
Dinner: ¥15,000-35,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Sushi Tokyo 81

Intimate with an air of sophistication, this backstreet Gotanda sushi restaurant offers traditional Edomae sushi with premium ingredients, as well as other signature offerings like a sea urchin tasting comparison course.
Lunch: ¥5,000-15,000
Dinner: ¥10,000-20,000
(1)
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Sushi Hajime (Shibuya)

Fall in love with Edomae sushi at this Shibuya sushi restaurant. It’s the rice that steals the show here: Aizu Koshihikari cooked traditionally in a hagama pot and treated with a proprietary blend of red vinegar made from sake lees.
Lunch: ¥5,000-15,000
Dinner: ¥15,000-30,000
(1)
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Robata En

Enjoy Chef Kazuki Itahara’s fresh take on an ancient Japanese culinary form, irori-style grilling. He draws on his extensive knowledge of French cuisine to bring out the natural flavors of his ingredients.
Dinner: ¥15,000-25,000
(1)
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Tempura Ten Soso Roppongi Hills

Tempura Ten Soso offers a premium tempura experience featuring fresh seasonal ingredients sourced within and outside Japan. The restaurant is headed by Chef Keita Sato, a famous name in the tempura scene.
Dinner: ¥30,000-50,000
(1)
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Sushi Koshikawa

Less than a minute from Akasaka Station’s Exit 7, this traditional Edomae sushi restaurant draws a regular crowd for its relaxed and inviting atmosphere, impeccable nigiri creations, and extensive sake offerings.
Lunch: ¥10,000-15,000
Dinner: ¥15,000-30,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Halal Sukiyaki Restaurant Diyafa

One of the first of its kind, Chef Osagawa Hideki’s halal sukiyaki restaurant near Mita offers Muslim diners a chance to try this Japanese staple, with top-quality Shiretoko wagyu beef from Hokkaido.
Lunch: ¥15,000-25,000
Dinner: ¥15,000-25,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Robata Omoto Kagurazaka

Charcoal-grilled Hokkaido pork, beef and seafood in the heart of Tokyo’s former geisha district Kagurazaka. Pair this intimate, rustic robatayaki experience with a glass of local Hokkaido sake or shochu.
Dinner: ¥15,000-30,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Alternative

At this Shirokane restaurant, vegetables don’t play second fiddle, instead being put in the spotlight via Chef Saito Takayuki’s creative French-based cuisine. Menu highlights change seasonally, with sweetfish in the summer and asparagus in spring.
Lunch: ¥7,000-35,000
Dinner: ¥7,000-35,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Sakana Bar Ebisu

Sakana Bar’s seafood offerings span almost every coastal culinary culture possible, using freshly-caught domestic Japanese seafood. Their oyster tasting comparison course is particularly popular with oyster aficionados.
Dinner: ¥5,000-10,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Kagurazaka Kuzuryu Soba

The pride of Fukui Prefecture, Echizen cuisine features prominently in this Kagurazaka restaurant, which uses the finest ingredients from the Hokuriku region. Seasonal delicacies from the Echizen Coast and local sake delight visitors.
Dinner: ¥5,000-15,000
COURSE MENU
FUKUOKA

Tatsumi Sushi

Solid fundamentals meet a flourish of Chef Matsuhata Taminobu’s creativity at his Fukuoka sushi restaurant. Here, each nigiri is seen as its own individual course.
Dinner: ¥15,000-25,000
COURSE MENU
FUKUOKA

Fujiyoshi

Active for over 60 years, this Tenjin restaurant offers the winning combination of yakitori and sashimi, the latter made from fish kept alive in tanks right up to the moment of preparation.
Dinner: ¥5,000-15,000
COURSE MENU
TOKYO

Makiyaki Ginza Onodera

Michelin-starred French restaurant with touches of Basque cuisine, where the smoky fragrance from their signature wood-fired grill welcomes visitors.
Lunch: ¥10,000-40,000
Dinner: ¥10,000-40,000
(11)
COURSE MENU
KYOTO

Funaokayama Shimizu

These Michelin-starred kaiseki course menus feature the best ingredients from Japan, but the rice is the real star. Made with Kyoto groundwater from Daitokuji Temple, it is fluffy, fragrant and cooked to perfection in an earthenware pot.
Dinner: ¥13,000-35,000
(8)
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Frequently Asked Questions

How to reserve restaurants in Japan?

You can make a reservation at a restaurant in Japan by direct phone call to the restaurant, or in some cases via direct reservation on their website if available. There also are some online reservation platforms but they are often in Japanese, like the restaurant’s website. To avoid the issue of language barriers and time differences, you can place your reservation through a secure platform that helps foreigners to make online reservations, such as byFood. You can use byFood to add filters and narrow down restaurants in Japan, to match the location and food type you are looking for. All you have to do is head to your desired restaurant page and enter your reservation details. If your reservation is successful, you will receive an email confirmation and have your reservation made on your behalf. In the event that the reservation was not successful, you will receive a failed reservation email notification.

Is a reservation required for restaurants in Japan?

Not all restaurants in Japan require a reservation but there are many that do, so this depends on the restaurant. Popular or high-end restaurants generally require a reservation and tend to be totally booked a few months ahead. Some more casual restaurants, bars, and cafes do not require a booking, however if you are with a big group it can be a good idea. Some restaurants like ramen restaurants and izakaya gastropubs do not allow reservations ahead of time.

What is the average cost of a meal at restaurants in Japan?

This depends on the type of restaurant but on average a meal at restaurants in Japan will cost somewhere between 800 yen and 3000 yen for one dish or set meal. More high-class restaurants can start from anywhere between 4000 and 10,000 yen per meal, with more being charged for dinner.

Best Restaurants in Japan

From fresh sushi to crispy tempura, Japan’s diverse restaurant scene excites visitors and locals alike with hundreds of thousands of high-quality Japanese restaurants. Beckoning with drool-worthy plastic replicas in their windows, both contemporary and traditional restaurants offer unique flavors and atmospheres. Enter any restaurant in Japan and immediately be welcomed with a hearty “irasshaimase!”

Many Japanese restaurants focus on one signature dish, like Japanese curry restaurants, ramen shops, or speciality restaurants selling yakitori grilled chicken skewers. Restaurants steam with DIY shabu-shabu hotpots while grill-it-yourself teppanyaki hotplate restaurants sizzle! Find tiny family-owned ramen shops hidden in the backstreets of Kyoto, and yatai street food stalls bustling in alleys of Fukuoka. And let’s not forget, Tokyo alone boasts the most Michelin-starred restaurants in the world!

Throughout the country, fine dining restaurants serving exquisite kaiseki banquets contrast cheap “shokudo” cafeterias meals for salarymen on-the-go. You can order dinner directly from a tablet or even a vending machine, or choose your own sushi pieces trundling past on the belt of a sushi train. Nibble on small plates as you drink up during an izakaya dining experience, seated on tatami flooring and cheersing “kampai!” with the locals. There are so many exciting Japan restaurant options with different foods and local cuisines to try, so don’t waste a moment of your trip looking for a restaurant! Reserve ahead of time at some of the best restaurants in Japan with byFood and secure some of the country’s best cuisine for your taste buds. Don't forget to say, “gochisosama deshita” when you leave any Japan restaurant, meaning “thank you for the meal!”