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Where to Eat in Shinagawa

By Aleli Dorado
July 12, 2019
Updated: October 8, 2020

Shinagawa is one of the busiest wards in Tokyo, with 7 train lines running through Shinagawa Station, providing easy access to the rest of the city. It is considered a travelers’ hub since it serves as a link between Tokyo and Kyoto and has ample hotels, offices, shops, and restaurants. Trains in Shinagawa are usually jam-packed especially during the morning and evening rush hours.

Though this Tokyo ward is the picture of modern-day business, Shinagawa still retains its old traditional charm. Delve into alleyways and you might stumble across minor shrines and temples. There are also many cool spots to visit in Shinagawa, like the Hara Museum for contemporary art and the Maxell Aqua Park, great places to cool off indoors during the sweltering summer or torrential downpour of the rainy season. When you’ve worked up an appetite by taking in the sights of Shinagawa, replenish your energy by exploring the different food hubs within Shinagawa. Let’s find out where to eat in Shinagawa, exploring the food culture and delicacies of this Tokyo ward.

Where to Eat in Shinagawa

Here are some recommended spots for a bit to eat in Shinagawa!

  1. Shinagawa Shinatatsu Ramen Street
  2. Sushiryori Inose
  3. Toriki 
  4. Izakaya Rojiura
  5. Iburiya
  6. Toriteru
  7. Masu-Kame
  8. Ryoma Kaido

1. Shinagawa Shinatatsu Ramen Street

Beside Shinagawa Station is a little enclave of ramen restaurants under the tracks. Welcome to Shinatatsu Ramen Street, where you can enjoy hearty ramen. Each of the ramen restaurants specializes in a different style of ramen. One shop on Shinatatsu Ramen Street is Mouko Tanmen Nakamoto, offering several types of ramen that vary in spiciness (from 1-10). Their specialty dish is miso tanmen, coming in at level 3 spiciness, while their cold miso ramen is at a whopping level 10. For those who aren’t confident about their spice tolerance, Nakamoto offers cold soy sauce tanmen. Other ramen shops in Shinagawa Shitatatsu Ramen Street include Natsuttei for Kumamoto-style ramen with black garlic and Tetsu for tsukemen (dipping-style ramen). Another celebrated haven for ramen lovers is Tokyo Ramen Street in Tokyo Station, just a 10 minute train ride from Shinagawa Station. We’ve covered all of their ramen shops in Tokyo Ramen Street: 8 of the Best Ramen Restaurants in Tokyo

2. Sushiryori Inose

sushi and ginger

Those who love sushi have got to head over to Sushiryori Inose, grab a counter seat, and dig into their omakase sushi set. An omakase meal, meaning “I’ll leave it up to you,” allows the chef to show off his prowess, choosing the freshest ingredients at his disposal to make a meal that’s fitting of the season and the guest. At this unpretentious, affordable sushi restaurant in Shinagawa, you can take your time and enjoy the meal, chatting with the friendly Chef Inose, who speaks a little English. Customers rave about this place for the chef’s hospitality, warmth, and sushi prowess, with loyal guests returning again and again. For more omakase sushi options that won’t break the bank, check out Affordable Omakase Sushi Restaurants in Tokyo.

3. Toriki 

yakitori

For those who’d like a fun izakaya experience, Toriki offers fantastic hospitality, a boisterous atmosphere, and delicious chicken which the chef deftly carves himself. His bestsellers include toriwasa (chicken sashimi) and momoyaki (a tender cut of grilled leg meat). Since owner-chef Kunio Aihara was featured on the late Anthony Bourdain’s show, “No Reservations,” he has received more international recognition and the place is usually crowded with diners. Reservations are a must, especially during Fridays and Saturdays.

4. Izakaya Rojiura

For those who love beef and spicy food, drop by the izakaya Rojiura for their tasty and spicy beef stew, which will only cost you about ¥700. Their deep-fried dumplings and horumon-yaki (grilled offal) are among their popular sides. Rojiura is also a great restaurant in Shinagawa to visit if you’re in the mood for a party, as they offer a 2-hour all-you-can-drink (nomihoudai) course for just ¥3500. For more info about all-you-can-drink restaurants in Tokyo, read Nomihoudai: The Best Places for All-You-Can-Drink in Tokyo.

5. Iburiya

At this little back alley yakiniku restaurant, you can grill your own meat right at the table over a charcoal fire. For some glorious yakiniku dinners, Iburiya will surely satisfy the craving with its Specialty Japanese Kalbi (beef ribs) for ¥1550. Enjoy cooking your own cuts of Japanese wagyu beef, for very reasonable prices (under ¥1600!) and taste the meat while it’s still fresh off the grill. This casual Japanese BBQ restaurant can get quite busy, but that’s just part of its charm. 

6. Toriteru

Yakitori is the name of the game at Toriteru, which is one of the most coveted spots to eat in Shinagawa, but due to its limited seating capacity (only 12 seats offered), you may have some difficulty landing a spot. Order the standard set of 9 yakitori skewers and enjoy the chef’s selection of items like sunagimo (gizzard), liver, bonjiri (chicken tail), uzura (quail), and chicken meatballs with chicken heart and scallions. These salty yakitori dishes pair best with drinks, especially beer.

7. Masu-Kame

Seafood is the main offering at Masu-Kame, which prides itself having its seafood brought straight from Toyosu Market every morning. Their sashimi dishes are best paired with their array of rare Japanese sake from Kuramoto. The course meals are priced quite reasonably, starting at ¥4600 for appetizers, sashimi, ribs, shrimp, seasonal vegetables, all-you-can-drink beer and shochu, and more! This Shinagawa restaurant has Japanese-style private rooms and seating for groups, so it’s a great place to hold a celebration with family and friends.

8. Ryoma Kaido

Shikoku ryori

For those who’d like to explore Shikoku cuisine from Japan’s smallest main island, visit Ryoma Kaido. With minimalist yet traditional design, spacious banquet halls that seat up to 70 guests, and sumptuous dishes, this Shinagawa restaurant has an ambiance that is reminiscent of the Studio Ghibli film, Spirited Away. Their must-try dishes are charcoal-grilled red bonito fish and Hachikin-jidori, local chicken from Kochi Prefecture. Enrobed in a garlic soy sauce, the succulent chicken thigh meat is a fan favorite at Ryoma Kaido.

For izakayas, ramen shops, yakitori, and yakiniku, there’s no better place than bustling Shinagawa. Now that you know where to eat in Shinagawa, go and discover this major ward of Tokyo. The selection of restaurants in Shinagawa will satisfy your hunger with its comforting grilled dishes, and make you feel at home with their warm hospitality.

And, as Shinagawa Station is such a major commuter hub, there are even more fantastic restaurants just a train ride away. Travel 10 minutes from Shinagawa to explore the food scene in Tokyo Station with our guide to What to Eat in Tokyo Station. Or, just 15-20 minutes away, check out the food scene in Yokohama, home to the Cup Noodle Museum, Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum, and Yokohama Chinatown, with our post: What to Eat in Yokohama: Japan’s Multicultural Port City.

Check out our YouTube videos and Instagram for more Japanese food and travel tips!


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Aleli Dorado
Aleli is a wanderlust whose main itinerary is to culture soak in the places that she sets foot on, sinking her teeth in the gustatory offerings that the place has to offer and knowing the story behind it. Food for her is a marriage of the sights, sounds, smells, and tastes of the rich history of every city she explores and uses the pen as her tool to share to the world each unique experience she unravels.
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