Search
Location
Book Food Experiences
Location
¥

Japanese Wine

(6)
While the culture of winemaking in Japan is relatively young, the variety of climates and prevalence of small-batch winemakers in Japan makes for a breeding ground for innovation, untethered by the laws of tradition.
Filter
Direct from Producer
Wine Type
Red
White
Rose
Sparkling Wine & Champagne
Year of Harvest
After 2010
2000-2009
1990-1999
1980-1989
1979 or earlier
Price
¥0 - ¥2500
¥2500 - ¥5000
¥5000 - ¥10000
¥10000+
Shipping
Free Shipping
Producer
Nissin
Yamadai
Matsuo
Sugihara Shoten
Yuya Murata
Tadashi Sugiyama
Satomi Maeshima
Kazuaki Takahashi
Norio Imura
Naganori Mori
Hyozaemon
Kimura Brewery
Akita Brewery
Ryoseki Brewery
Tomiya Shoten
Sanyo Coffee
Sapporo Beer
Aoba Foods
Ito Pickles Shop
Daisen Sono LLC
Inaniwa Udon Hanbai Co.
Kobayashi Ichizo Shoten
Komachi no Kuni Tezukuri Kobo Co.
Kamuro no Megumi Co.
Tentatsu
Region
Aichi
Akita
Aomori
Chiba
Ehime
Fukui
Fukuoka
Fukushima
Gifu
Gunma
Hiroshima
Hokkaido
Hyogo
Ibaraki
Ishikawa
Iwate
Kagawa
Kagoshima
Kanagawa
Kochi
Kumamoto
Kyoto
Mie
Miyagi
Miyazaki
Nagano
Nagasaki
Nara
Niigata
Oita
Okayama
Okinawa
Osaka
Saga
Saitama
Shiga
Shimane
Shizuoka
Tochigi
Tokushima
Tokyo
Tottori
Toyama
Wakayama
Yamagata
Yamaguchi
Yamanashi
Dietary Restriction
Gluten-free
Halal
Kosher
Pescetarian
Vegan
Vegetarian
Apply Filters
Clear All Filter

Buy Japanese Wine Online

The meticulous attention to detail that’s central to Japanese craftsmanship has come to define the nation’s attitude towards fruit, like gift melons that go for a hundred dollars, luxury packs of white strawberries, and grapes that are so sweet that they taste like candy. It’s no wonder that the country has developed a taste for winemaking, with 45 of Japan’s 47 prefectures producing the beverage, according to the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO).

Yamanashi prefecture, in particular, is accountable for over 25% of Japan’s grapes, creating a climate that’s literally ripe for winemaking. Yamanashi produces about half of the Japanese wine on the market, the most of any prefecture. If you’re wondering where to buy Japanese wine or which Japanese wine brands to go for, Yamanashi is a great starting point. In fact, Yamanashi was the first prefecture to produce domestic wine.

Wine was introduced to the Japanese by Portuguese missionaries in the 16th century but, according to the Japan Wineries Association, production of the beverage didn’t take off until the 1870s when the first Japanese wine company was established in Yamanashi by two men who had just returned from studying winemaking in France.

Of course, for those looking to shop for Japanese wine, there are a wide variety of Japanese wine brands from other prefectures. Many of the over 300 wineries in Japan are small-batch producers, leading to an interesting range of Japanese wines. In particular, the cooler climates of Hokkaido and Nagano prefectures, also located in central Japan, have been popular breeding grounds for winemakers in recent years.

It goes without saying that the best wine with Japanese food would be Japan-made wines. With the immense diversity of Japanese wines, made from both indigenous grape varieties, cross-bred types, and specialty grapes like Chardonnay which originated in France; there is a perfect wine pairing for every Japanese dish. With the delicate and subtle nature of Japanese cuisine, equally delicate and nuanced Japanese wine is the perfect match.

With a variety of wines from Nagano, Hokkaido, and beyond; buy Japanese wines right here on Japan’s one-stop food platform. And speaking of Japanese wines, if you’re interested in the so-called “rice wine” nihonshu (not technically a wine, as its production is more akin to beer brewing), we also have a section for Japanese sake, as well. For umeshu plum wine (another misleading moniker) and other boozy delights, check out our range of other alcoholic beverages.